Turkey’s Thirty-Year Coup – The New Yorker

Shared by Dr. Nasik Elahi

This article opens a window into another Islamic movement headed by yet another
religious/political leader with a messianic message.  The gulenists are a formidable
movement that is shaping the future of Turkey and the region in yet unknown ways.
Nasik

 
This article opens a window into another Islamic movement headed by  yet another religious/political leader with a messianic message.     The gulenists are a formidable movement that is shaping the future ofTurkey and the region in yet unknown ways.
Nasik

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/10/17/turkeys-thirty-year-coup?mbid=nl_161011_Daily&CNDID=17878219&spMailingID=9670305&spUserID=MTMzMTc5NjY5Nzg4S0&spJobID=1020852209&spReportId=MTAyMDg1MjIwOQS2



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2 thoughts on “Turkey’s Thirty-Year Coup – The New Yorker

  1. Thanks for the article. Bangladesh is also a secular country of Muslim majority which was not mentioned. Situation in Turkey seems far more complicated than Pakistan. With a bit of over-simplification, leaders like Nawaz Shareef, Shahbaz Shareef and Asif Zardari are far better than Erdogan or Gullen. Imran Khan is gradually becoming the Trump equivalent of Pakistan. The charter schools of Gullen, all over the world, can be loosely compared to Minhajul Quran branches of Tahir ul Qadri. Many interesting comparisons can be drawn because the basic DNA of Islam runs common in Turkey, the Sub-continent and the Middle Eastern Muslim majority states.
    Wequar Azeem

  2. If there is any lesson that Muslim majority countries can learn from the failed coup of Turkey is that no religious schools should be allowed to brain wash their children as per their own agenda, the curriculum must be standard throughout the country. The reason given by operators of religious schools is usually educating poor children and that is all they should do, by strictly following standard curriculum only. When some people start calling each other “brother”, its a red flag. Pakistan has certainly learned this already the hard way. Its not easy to tame the Mullahs but work is in progress in Pakistan.

    Wequar Sahib’s comparison of Gulen with Tahir Ul Qadri and Minhaj Ul Quran is correct.
    The difference between Turkey and Pakistan’s establishment is that Turkish establishment encourages secularism and Pakistan’s has an opposite history of nurturing religious fundos. Gullen tried to infiltrate all institutions, bureaucrats and forces, like osmosis – gradually diluting these institutions. A genius indeed. Similar situation can arise in Pakistan as well because of Zia’s indoctrination that began with training of Jihad against Russia.

    Gulen seems to be enjoying backing of America just like Altaf Hussain is enjoying backing of England. I wonder when will Western powers stop interfering in other’s business. America doesn’t learn any lessons from history too. Pinochet of Chile, Shah of Iran …..

    At the end of the article author says that Gulen does not want to be remembered, he wishes to be forgotten; yeah, after spreading a network of schools all over the world, inciting rebellion, this wannabe Khomeini, if not a prophet (speaks to Mohammad and God directly), wants to be forgotten!

    Babar

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