Supporting Pakistanis, Stopping the Taliban; submitted by fayyaz sheikh

Interesting discussion in NYT article between six scholars of Pkaistan.


Many Pakistanis have united to condemn the Taliban for shooting Malala Yousafzai, a 14-year-old schoolgirl. According to a Taliban spokesman, the girl was targeted because she “was promoting Western culture in Pashtun areas.”

Is there a way to safely support women’s rights in Taliban-heavy areas? What can Pakistan and its allies do to either work with the Taliban on reform initiatives, or stop it from terrorizing civilians?

 

HUSAIN HAQQANI, FORMER PAKISTANI AMBASSADOR


“The international community can help Pakistan fight the ideological battle against the Taliban with training, equipment and economic support.”


AMNA BUTTAR, DOCTOR AND FORMER MEMBER OF PAKISTANI PARLIAMENT



“The women and children of Pakistan don’t need special envoys, drones, or even foreign aid. They need our sympathy and attention.”



ANDREW WILDER, UNITED STATES INSTITUTE OF PEACE


 

“Those working for women’s rights who live in Taliban-heavy areas best understand how to operate in culturally sensitive ways while also recognizing that there are no “quick fixes.””

 

PIR ZUBAIR SHAH, JOURNALIST

 

“The policy of fighting some groups who are deemed a threat while at the same time supporting other extremists for strategic purposes has confused most Pakistanis.”

 

IZA SHAH, DEVELOPMENTS IN LITERACY

 

“International organizations must collaborate with local N.G.O.s to bring about a revolutionary change in the field of education.”

 

MARK N. KATZ, AUTHOR, “LEAVING WITHOUT LOSING”

 

“Islamabad should invest in armed protection for girls’ schools and public relations efforts throughout ulnerable Pashtun areas.”

 

 

Read full discussion by clicking on link below of NYT

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/10/15/supporting-pakistanis-stopping-the-taliban/?hp

 

 

 

My ‘Small Video Star’ Fights for Her Life By ADAM B. ELLICK

I had the privilege of following Malala Yousafzai, on and off, for six months in 2009, documenting some of the most critical days of her life for a two-part documentary. We filmed her final school day before the Taliban closed down her school in Pakistan’s Swat Valley; the summer when war displaced and separated her family; the day she pleaded with President Obama’s special representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan, Richard Holbrooke, to intervene; and the uncertain afternoon she returned to discover the fate of her home, school and her two pet chickens.

 

Read the rest of the article by clicking the following link:

http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/10/09/my-small-video-star-fights-for-her-life/?emc=eta1